Seed Catalog Bounty

Things to think about when purchasing seeds.

Seed catalogs

They arrive during the coldest, shortest days of the year when gardeners are at their most optimistic (and vulnerable)…

THIS! This will be the year when the garden is perfect!  The flowers will boom profusely unmarred by powdery mildew and Japanese beetles.  The vegetable garden will be abundant (all of it, not just the zucchini) and the slugs will take themselves off leaving the seedlings whole and the cabbage unmolested. 

If it’s going to be that great, I better order some extra stuff…. 

Sigh, hope springs eternal.  Especially when looking at all those lovey, glossy pictures in seed catalogs while snow swirls outside..

I try to rein myself in, but it’s hard sometimes.  I especially have a weakness for seeds.  What harm could a few extra packs do? My only control mechanism is to force myself to plan out where I will put everything I buy.  I still end up with too much stuff, but it’s not as bad as it could be!

Seeds are a great way to grow plants, but there are a few things to think about before purchasing seeds…

  • As I said, have some idea of where you’ll plant the seedlings you intend to grow – matching the growing conditions required (amount of sun, moisture and soil type) with the spaces you have in your yard.
  • Can the seeds be directly sowed in the garden or do you need to start them in advance inside the house? Seedlings need good light to get a strong start and you may need to add supplemental lighting. With inadequate light, seedlings will be thin, leggy and weak.
  • Seedlings need your care and attention while they are growing large enough to be planted out. Do you have the space and the time to care for seedlings for 6, 8 or even 10 weeks? The seed catalog should have information on how much time a particular seedling will need. Some seed suppliers have seed starting calculators to help you plan. (You can find the last expected frost date for your area here.)
  • Consider the source of the seeds. Seeds coming from hardiness zones similar to where you live may be better adapted to your growing conditions.
  • You will need containers and a sterile growing medium to start your seeds if you are starting them indoors, plus well lit room for all those little pots.

Starting seeds can be extremely satisfying, especially when you see those lovely blooms or bite into that juicy tomato from a plant you started from a wee little seed. But a little advance thought and planning will help avoid frustration.

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